WHO publishes a catalogue of tests to prioritize disease diagnosis
Category: #health  By Saipriya Iyer  Date: 2018-05-18
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WHO publishes a catalogue of tests to prioritize disease diagnosis

In what may seem to be quite a strategic move toward the improvisation of healthcare services across the globe, the World Health Organization has published its first ‘essential diagnostics list’. Fundamentally, this list is a catalogue of tests for detecting the most common conditions along with priority ailments.

Reportedly, this measure was taken to address problems in accessing diagnostic services, owing to which the masses have been unable to obtain proper treatment for ailments. For the record, nearly 46% of adults suffering from Type 2 diabetes across the globe were not diagnosed for diabetes. WHO has claimed that not detecting these disorders at the right time is likely to generate severe health problems and will also substantially raise healthcare costs.

It has been speculated that the late diagnosis of ailments such as TB and HIV raises the risk of their severity and makes it more difficult for the healthcare service providers to treat them accordingly. WHO also states that its essential diagnostics list focuses on in-vitro clinical tests such as Urine & blood tests for disease detection. In addition, fifty-eight tests included in the list are for identifying a large number of common disease conditions, generating a suitable platform for patient screening & handling activities. The rest of the fifty-five tests described in the list are used for diagnosing priority ailments such as Malaria, Syphilis, HIV, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, TB, and human papillomavirus.

Some of the clinical tests in the list are more suited for primary healthcare activities endowed with poor laboratory services. Experts claim that the list has been developed to serve as a guide for other nations through which they can create their own essential diagnostics lists.

According to some of WHO’s key officials, the list is likely to be upgraded regularly. In addition, WHO will also issue a call to various applications for appending new categories to the future editions.

The expansion of the list will continue in the future with the inclusion of antimicrobial resistance, new noncommunicable ailments, evolving pathogens, and ignored tropical diseases.



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Saipriya Iyer

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Saipriya Iyer

Saipriya Iyer develops content for Market Size Forecasters, Algosonline, and myriad other platforms. A computer engineer by profession, she ventured into the field of writing for the love of playing with words. Having had a previous experience of 3 years under her bel...

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