Zealand Pharma carries out Phase 1 clinical trial for SBS treatment
Category: #health  By Paroma Bhattacharya  Date: 2019-06-27
  • share
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIn

Zealand Pharma carries out Phase 1 clinical trial for SBS treatment

ZP7570 may be regarded as the next gen in the treatment and will help the SBS patients worldwide to understand the full potential of intestinal rehabilitation.

The Denmark based- Zealand Pharma, a biotechnology company involved in the discovery and development of peptide-based medicines has reportedly announced the dosing of the first subject in Phase 1 clinical trial of ZP7570, a potential treatment for SBS (short bowel syndrome).

As per trusted sources, ZP7570 is a dual GLP-1 / GLP-2 peptide medication that aims at managing and curing SBS. It may be regarded as the next gen in the treatment and will help the SBS patients worldwide to understand the full potential of intestinal rehabilitation.

For the record, GLP-2 improves the absorbing capacity of the intestines, while, GLP -1 apparently reduces the gastrointestinal motility. The medicinal properties in ZP7570 may allow the treatment of other gastrointestinal diseases.

Adam Steensberg, Executive Vice President and Chief Medical and Development officer, Zealand Pharma was quoted stating that the company is determined to change the lives of people affected with SBS.  Additionally, the company also seeks positive results from its Phase 3 clinical trial with glepaglutide, a best-in-class long-acting GLP-2 analog for the treatment of the syndrome. The initiation of the first phase trial with ZP7570, a dual GLP-1 / GLP-2 acting peptide, will mark an extremely important step taken by Zealand to innovate and discover medications in the effective treatment of SBS for patients, he further claimed.

Reportedly, SBS is a critical condition associated with complete loss of intestinal function. Patients are usually connected to pumps and infusion lines everyday, which further restricts the person’s ability to carry out daily activities. The patients diagnosed with SBS are prone to life-threatening diseases like liver damage, blood clots, sepsis and renal impairment.

Zealand Pharma’s clinical study is a double bind, placebo-controlled and single dose trial on 64 healthy subjects, randomized to ZP7570, the properties of which may also allow for therapeutic opportunities in many other gastrointestinal devises.

Source Credits https://www.nasdaq.com/press-release/zealand-pharma-doses-first-subject-in-phase-1-clinical-trial-with-potential-next-generation-20190626-00028



About Author

Paroma Bhattacharya

Email: [email protected]   

Paroma Bhattacharya

Paroma currently works as a content developer for Algosonline, MSF and a series of alike platforms. Fortified with a post-graduation degree in Journalism and Mass Communication, she delved head long into a writing career, creating resourceful and information enriched ...

Read More

More News By Paroma Bhattacharya

Aino Health inks deal with 55BirchStreet to expand in German markets
Aino Health inks deal with 55BirchStreet to expand in German markets
By Paroma Bhattacharya

Reports confirm that Sweden’s Aino Health and 55BirchStreet, a Germany-based digital consulting firm, have recently signed a new partnership agreement. 55BitchStreet will sell implementation services and licenses...

Visa acquires Payworks for an integrated payment acceptance solution
Visa acquires Payworks for an integrated payment acceptance solution
By Paroma Bhattacharya

Visa, the financial services company recently announced acquisition of Payworks, the Munich-based makers of payment gateway software for the POS (point of sale). The company plans to integrate cloud-based solution of P...

MacroGenics, I-Mab team up to develop & market enoblituzumab in China
MacroGenics, I-Mab team up to develop & market enoblituzumab in China
By Paroma Bhattacharya

MacroGenics, Inc. and I-Mab Biopharma, a U.S. and China based clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company that is committed to discover and develop biologics in autoimmune and immune-oncology diseases, have recently announc...